Have you ever wondered why the bacteria used to make yogurt is called Lactobacillus bulgaricus?

Have you ever wondered why the bacteria used to make yogurt is called Lactobacillus bulgaricus?

The Bulgarian physician and microbiologist Dr. Stamen Grigorov was just 27 years old when he discovered Lactobacillus bulgaricus – the bacteria that literally makes yogurt. And no wonder – there are yogurts on the market that claim originality, but the origins of yogurt are loud and clear in the Bulgarian countryside.

Born in the village of Studen Izvor, Tran Municipality, Bulgaria, on 27 October 1878, he completed his secondary education in natural sciences in Montpellier, France and medical science in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1905, in the microbiological laboratory of Professor Léon Massol in Geneva, Grigorov discovered that a certain strain of bacillus is the basis of yogurt.

Where did he take the yogurt for his research from?

At the beginning of the 20th century yogurt was gaining popularity as a healthy food so Dr. Grigorov was not the only scientist who was wondering what was so special about the simple food from his home country. Be he had a head start! He brought to his lab a small batch of yogurt made by his wife in his home village to study it. Soon after his hard work paid off.

The rod-shaped bacteria that cause the milk to ferment and turn into yogurt was called Lactobacillus bulgaricus in his recognition. Dr. Grigorov described the exact composition of yogurt in a scientific paper which became popular after the Russian biologist and Nobel Prize-winner Ilya Metchnikoff cited it in his book The Prolongation of Life (1908). Metchnikoff also suggested that the longevity of the Bulgarian peasants is due to their daily consumption of yogurt which led to introducing the healthy food in many Western European countries.

The discovery of Lactobacillus bulgaricus is not the only reason Dr. Stamen Grigorov’s work was widely respected. He also contributed to the creation of a tuberculosis treatment with penicillin fungi in 1906, along Albert Calmette. The healing effect of those fungi was documented in scientific experiments in-vitro and in-vivo on lab animals and human patients.

Dr. Stamen Grigorov died on 27 October 1945, but his legacy is still vivid. Soon after his death – in the 1950s, the Bulgarian yogurt company patented a specific blend of bacterial strains to preserve the original. This specific blend is still exported today to many yogurt producers around the world. To commemorate the scientist’s remarkable achievements a glacier on Brabant Island in Antarctica carries the name Grigorov Glacier.


The Unique Taste of Bulgarian Yogurt

The Unique Taste of Bulgarian Yogurt

Bulgarian style yogurt is a super yogurt packed with even more health benefits than what the American consumer is used to! We offer an unparalleled combination of culture strains and the excellence of the organic cow milk of Chenango county dairy farms where Trimona Bulgarian Yogurt is made.

How Bulgarian yogurt differs from Greek yogurt?

Have you ever tried to compare the Bulgarian type of yogurt against the Greek ones? Usually, the Greek holds a milder taste with creamy texture, which is direct result from its straining.

Bulgarian Yogurt is not strained, whereas all Greek yogurt is. But why should you care?

Well, by straining it you remove some of the most beneficial ingredients: the whey. The whey fraction contains the highest quality protein in milk, along with a number of essential minerals, like calcium. Strained and discarded, acid whey also becomes an environmental issue.

Thanks to the specific combination of probiotic bacteria Bulgarian Yogurt is very low in sugar, thus creating its unique tart taste. And because we always aim for more, Trimona’s yogurt is also Organic, Non-GMO Verified, Gluten-free, Kosher and A2A2 tested.

 

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Brief history of yogurt

Brief history of yogurt

Plain yogurt is part of the local Bulgarian diet for centuries, but its modern era began at the beginning of 1900s with the discovery of the “good bacteria” responsible for turning milk into yogurt. The bacteria now known as Lactobacillus bulgaricus is native to Bulgaria and could be found in air, soil, bark of the trees, and hills, gras dew drops etc. In the country’s pristine mountains shepherds made yogurt with the naturally born fermenting bacteria by squeezing the juice from plants such as Christ’s thorn and Barberry and adding to it warm milk. The peasants in the villages made their yogurt by sopping leftovers of the tastiest yogurt in the new batch.

This natural selection led to the creation of the healthiest and best tasting yogurt in the world today and Lactobacillus bulgaricus became a national treasure.

The “good bacteria” was first discovered by the Bulgarian scientist Dr. Stamen Grigorov in 1905 and in his honor was named Bulgaricus. Lactobacillus bulgaricus produces a very unique and specific set of fatty acids after it “eats” milk’s lactose. This process transforms milk into the thick substance of yogurt. The biologist and Nobel prize winner, Ilya Metchnikoff – while working for the Institut Pasteur, Paris, was fascinated by this discovery. His curiosity led him to study in detail the diet of the Bulgarian centenarians and he was able to link the daily yogurt consumption to their longevity. At that time Bulgaria took first place for the number of centenarians per capita among 38 European countries. Metchnikoff discovered the correlation between the probiotic bacteria and their ability to inhibit harmful food fermentation in the gut which delays the aging process.

This is the reason every commercially produced yogurt brand on the planet is more than happy to print Lactobacillus bulgaricus on its label. Yogurt commonly contains two sets of probiotic bacteria – Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Major impact on the taste and health benefits come from the strains of those bacteria used in the different yogurt recipes around the world. The Bulgarian type undeniably being the best.

Let the Greeks have their philosophers and leave the yogurt to us – the Bulgarians.

Yogurt is an ancient food consumed in various geographic regions of the world. In the US commercial production started just 80 years ago, but quickly found its way to the American lifestyle. It became a base for the morning cereal and snack alternative. Being a bit tart or too mild for the American palate, the plain yogurt was soon supplemented by other flavored varieties, with added fruits or sugar and is now common treat on shelves of the grocery stores.

Among them Trimona Bulgarian yogurt is striving to give the best quality and nutritional value possible. Find our products here: Where to buy


Poached eggs

Poached eggs

INGREDIENTS

  • 8 eggs
  • 4 tsp butter (preferably organic, grass-fed)
  • 1 cup Trimona Bulgarian Yogurt
  • 3/4 cup crumbled Bulgarian Feta Cheese (optional)
  • 1 Tbsp vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp paprika
  • 1 tsp chopped parsley
  • 2 cloves of minced garlic
  • Salt and pepper to taste

PREPARATION

Mix yogurt with the crushed garlic, salt, pepper and feta cheese and distribute equally in 4 plates. In boiling water add some salt and the vinegar, then crack the eggs and drop them in boiling water carefully so the yolk doesn’t break. Cook until the egg white cooks and covers the yolk (approximately 3 minutes). Take eggs out of the water with a large draining spoon to drain the excess water. Place two whole eggs in each plate over the yogurt. Pour melted butter on top of the eggs and sprinkle with paprika and parsley. Serve as is or add some fresh avocado cubes and broccoli florets.


Smoothie

INGREDIENTS

  • 1Cup Trimona yogurt
  • 1Tablespoon Ginger Root (peeled, freshly grated)
  • 1/2Apple (unpeeled)
  • 1Tablespoon Raw Honey
  • 1Teaspoon Cinnamon
  • 1Teaspoon Maca Root Powder (optional)

PREPARATION

Peel and grate ginger. Cut apple in 1"cubes. Add the rest of the ingredients in a blender and mix. For runnier consistency you may add a few more pieces of apple and 1/3 cup of yogurt.